Cooking PHPUnit (and a chef-solo example on top)

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I'm sure most of you noticed that with the recent upgrade of PHPUnit to version 3.6, a lot of breakage was introduced in various projects.

And for example Zend Framework 1.x won't update to the latest version either. When I ranted on twitter someone send me Christer Edvartsen's blog post on how to setup multiple versions of PHPUnit. It's really neat since it walks you through the setup step by step and you learn about things such as --installroot on the way. --installroot in particular is something I never ever saw before and I've been using PEAR for more than a few years now. So kudos to Christer for introducing myself to it.

The only thing to add from my side would be, Why are you guys not aggregated on planet-php?.

Cooking with Chef

Another reason why I decided to write this blog entry was that I created a chef-recipe based on Christer's blog entry.

If you follow my blog for a while, you might have noticed that I'm a huge fan of automation. I just moved one of our development servers the other day and had one of these moments where something just paid off. Taking for granted that I can spin up fully operational EC2 instances in minutes, I also had our development stack installed and configured in an instant.

My recipe basically follows Christer's instructions and because I distribute phpunit's command along with it, editing of the file is no longer required: when the chef run completes, phpunit34 is installed and ready to be used.

Get started

I'm doing the following commands as root — my setup is in /root/chef-setup.

Install chef(-solo) and clone my cookbooks

shell# gem install --no-ri --no-rdoc chef
... 
shell# git clone git://github.com/till/easybib-cookbooks.git
...

Chef configuration

Then setup a node.json file which chef-solo will need to run:

{
  "run_list": [
    "recipe[phpunit]"
  ]
}

Then create a solo.rb:

file_cache_path "/var/chef-solo"
cookbook_path ["/root/chef-setup/easybib-cookbooks"]

Chef run

Finally we start chef-solo with following command:

shell# chef-solo -c /root/chef-setup/solo.rb -j /root/chef-setup/node.json -l debug
...

The command runs chef-solo (which is part of the gem we installed) and reads the basic configuration from the solo.rb-file. This file contains the location of the cookbooks (remember git clone ...) and a path to cache files. You don't need to create anything, it should be all taken care of.

The node.json-part allows us to set node-specific values. The prime example is the run-list, but it allows you to set attributes as well. Attributes contain values for variables used in recipes, but are not used in this example.

Last but not least: -l debug — a lot of useful output, but we usually run with -l warn. And if this is interesting enough for you, I suggest the other blog entries I wrote on this topic.

Did it work?

Depending on the location of your pear setup — usually /usr/bin/pear or /usr/local/bin/pear — the phpunit34 script is created in the same path:

shell# which phpunit34
/usr/local/bin/phpunit34

Yay!

Fin

This feels like hitting two birds with one stone. Though just by figure of speech! I object to violence against birds.

It might be overkill to setup chef to just install phpunit 3.4 by itself, but I think this serves as a stellar example of how you can leverage the power of chef to get more done. Writing a couple more recipes to install and configure the rest of your stack shouldn't be too hard.

If you'd like to see anything in particular: I'll take requests via email, Twitter or in the comments.

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